BUILDING AND BREAKING TRUST IN TECH

Share who said the following was important in their decision to use each type of company. Responses were gathered among users or customers.

Identical to findings in previous Morning Consult trust reports, consumers prioritize data privacy and protection above all else when considering whether they will use or purchase something from a company. Large shares of social media users also consider preventing misinformation (75 percent), reputation (73 percent) and employee care (71 percent) when thinking about which platforms they will use.

Responses for tech product companies tended to be stronger -- higher portions of customers said each listed attribute was more important for tech products when compared to what users said of social media platforms.

Share who said the following was important in determining whether they trust each type of company. Responses were gathered among users or customers.

And the pattern continues when respondents are asked to consider which factors are important for determining whether they trust each type of tech company. The most consumers named issues connected to data privacy -- protecting consumer data, privacy and security, as well as refusing to share data with others without their permission -- with tech product customers expressing stronger opinions about tech product companies than social media users about social platforms.

Share who said the following would make them trust each type of company less. Responses were gathered among users or customers.

Customer data again shows up on “trust benders,” or things that would impact consumer trust but not necessarily break it. More than 4 in 5 social media users say any sort of data sharing, either intentionally without their permission or unintentionally via a data breach, would make them trust a platform less. Roughly three-quarters said the same if a platform allowed harmful content or permitted misinformation on their site.

DIVE DEEPER:

A fair share (41 percent) of social media users said banning accounts for violating platform policies would make them trust a company less. Much of that is driven by Republicans -- 53 percent said they would trust a platform less -- but such a move could negatively impact Americans of all political stripes. Thirty-five percent of Democrats and 38 percent of independents said the same.

Share who said the following would make them stop using each type of company and never use them again. Responses were gathered among users or customers.

Indeed, 22 percent of social media users would leave a platform if it banned other users for violating site rules about information sharing.


While most consumers who do abandon a brand do so because of a personal experience they had, a small but not insignificant share have stopped using a brand because of negative buzz.

Fourteen percent of the U.S. public stopped purchasing electronics -- such as smartphones or computers -- from a specific technology product company because of negative things they’ve heard about the brand.

Another quarter say they’ve ceased their relationship with a brand because of a personal negative experience.


Up Next: Conclusion

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